the-little-house-of-morons:

cearalucaya:

aquaticslime:

the-little-house-of-morons:

Ok so this is going to sound stupid as shit to most people but holy shit, when I see children/baby clothes I get so confused.  Beyond reasoning.   I even ask things like “why is doll clothes so expensive holy shit’ or “do children actually exist or is this clothing for gnomes?”  I don’t understand.  The tiny clothes, just… THE TINY CLOTHES.  LOOK.  IT’S A WAISTCOAT FOR A 1 YEAR OLD.  WHY IS THIS SO FUNNY TO ME.  It’S A TINy SuiT FOR BABIES.  WHY.

Don’t try to put logic into this.  I KNOW that formal wear is required for like.. weddings, church n shit.  but LOOK AT THE PHOTo.  LOOK AT THE TinY FULL OUTFIT.  IT”sSO FUNNY tO me.

they’re for lITTLE BABY BUSINESS PEOPLE OMFG

V begged for me to add these. I’m so sorry.

"susan, rechedule my 9 o’clock meeting. I just shit my pants."

"Johnny, find out what this peek-a-boo asshole wants. He keeps kidnapping my family and giving them back"

"JERRY. I JUST TOOK A NAP. AND I’M STILL TIRED OF YOUR SHIT."

"LOOK. JOHNSON. PULL THIS OFF, AND YOU’LL BE DRIVING A NEW POWER WHEELS BY NEXT WEEK."

"Don’t try to bullshit me Johnson, I wasn’t born yesterday. I was born four months ago."

"Man, you should see me secretary’s rack. Lunch for DAYS."

"Alright mark, let’s talk numbers. But keep in mine that I can only count to five."

"TELL IAN I’M NOT SIGNING THE AGREEMENT UNTIL HE GIVES ME MY NOSE BACK"

"SUSAN. I’M MEETING THE CEO AT THE AIRPORT. CALL FOR MY TRICYCLE"

"JOHNSON GET IN HERE. I CAN’T EAT THIS WITHOUT THE PLANE SOUND."

"WE NEED TO MEET OUR PUKE QUOTA"

"MOMMY ISN’T STRESSED ENOUGH AND WE’RE HITTING OUR DEADLINE"

"AIDEN. AIDEN. LISTEN TO ME. GIVE ME THE JUICE"

"CLARISEE YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND. I NEED THIS PACIFIER"

"DAMMIT JIMMY I NEED THAT PLAYDATE FOR TOMORROW’

I am

legit in fucking

tears

baby business people ahahahahah

@

(via this-chick-digs-chicks)

neurosciencestuff:

A weighty discovery

Humans have developed sophisticated concepts like mass and gravity to explain a wide range of everyday phenomena, but scientists have remarkably little understanding of how such concepts are represented by the brain.

Using advanced neuroimaging techniques, Queen’s University researchers have revealed how the brain stores knowledge about an object’s weight – information critical to our ability to successfully grasp and interact with objects in our environment.

Jason Gallivan, a Banting postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychology, and Randy Flanagan, a professor in the Department of Psychology, used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to uncover what regions of the human brain represent an object’s weight prior to lifting that object. They found that knowledge of object weight is stored in ventral visual cortex, a brain region previously thought to only represent those properties of an object that can be directly viewed such as its size, shape, location and texture.

“We are working on various projects to determine how the brain produces actions on the world,” explains Dr. Gallivan about the work he is undertaking at the Centre for Neuroscience Studies at Queen’s. “Simply looking at an object doesn’t provide the brain with information about how much that object weighs. Take for example a suitcase. There is often nothing about its visual appearance that informs you of whether it is packed with clothes or empty. Rather, this is information that must be derived through recent interactions with that object and stored in the brain so as to guide our movements the next time we must lift and interact with that object.”

According to previous research, the ventral visual cortex supports visual processing for perception and object recognition whereas the dorsal visual cortex supports visual processing for the control of action. However, this division of labour had only been tested for visually guided actions like reaching, which are directed towards objects, and not for actions involving the manipulation of objects, which requires access to stored knowledge about object properties.

“Because information about object weight is primarily important for the control of action, we thought that this information might only be stored in motor-related areas of the brain,” says Dr. Gallivan. “Surprisingly, however, we found that this non-visual information was also stored in ventral visual cortex. Presumably this allows for the weight of an object to become easily associated with its visual properties.”

In ongoing research, Drs. Gallivan and Flanagan are using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to temporarily disrupt targeted brain areas in order to assess their contribution to skilled object manipulation. By identifying which areas of the brain control certain motor skills, Drs. Gallivan and Flanagan’s research will be helpful in assessing patients with neurological impairments including stroke.

The work was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). The research was recently published in Current Biology.

(via thenewenlightenmentage)